Archive for Manson Family

“Happiness Is A Warm Gun”…

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , on August 9, 2015 by Kaden Brown

One of the major philosophical pillars of “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A Dialogue With Sadie Mae Glutz” revolves around the Beatles’ song from “The Beatles” (The White Album), “Happiness Is a Warm Gun“.

Interestingly, for reasons the book explains in great detail – the song is reportedly Paul McCartney’s and George Harrison’s favourite song on the White Album (see the Bruce Spizer 2003 book, “The Beatles on Apple Records.)

No wonder when one considers exactly how the meaning of the song was conceived and the massive impact the philosophy had upon late-60’s pop-culture:

The pleasure we got from life, of living by our own rules – we had none – meant we had the power, inside each one of us, to continue the cycle of pain, spread it into society and help charge-up the karma cycle. The pain we caused meant more happiness.”

“Happiness is a warm gun?”

“Ha-ha, you have it!”

“It is utterly mad.”

“You see the power of what I’m saying. It scares you.”

“Of course it does. How can you warp logic so much that innocent people die? For such a dire and terrifying possibility, that death, that pain, are good things. That they cause happiness.”

“Yet you instinctively knew that a warm gun equals happiness?”

“It’s the name of a fucking song, not some metaphysical empiricism!”

“Yet you connected the idea and the song instantly.”

“It is not that difficult. You know, to make “happiness” you cause pain.”

The interview with Susan Atkins (Sadie) explains Paul’s, George’s, and John’s conversations with her, following the band’s final concert at Candlestick Park, San Francisco on August 29, 1966. It explains how they met during a private performance at the Church of Satan where she worked. What happened next was the spark, the moment of epiphany, that set the Fab Four upon a new direction.

That night spawned an entirely new and deadly philosophy that directly led to the breakup of the band following the arrest of Manson Family members, and denials and mistruths concerning the role The Beatles played.

But then the book isn’t actually true…

This weekend only, “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A Dialogue With Sadie Mae Glutz”  is available free from Kindle.

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Sadie’s Making Me Nervous

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2015 by Kaden Brown

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With two previously published books, both in the paranormal or ‘urban fiction’ genre, you may expect me to have become accustomed to feeling nervous or anxious prior to launch.

Oddly, I previously never gave such nervousness much thought. Maybe with those books – mere candyfloss compared to Sadie’s meaty and gut-wrenching story – which were longer and more “story-ish” there was not much of me invested in them. So maybe, I never even felt nervous in the run-up to publication…

With “Wear A Flower In You Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” there is a lot of “me” in the book. Surprisingly it does not really tell a story that will sweep the reader off their feet. It is not a flowing romp through the joys and wonders of immortality, or a hazy battle set-upon the mangled crest of some hill, or a happy and tearful exploration of love, dance and loss.

This is Sadie’s story. It is an interview and as such Sadie guides where it takes us and the interviewer. She doesn’t have a happy story to tell. It doesn’t have a happy ending, nor does the story even make the reader or on-looker envious and wanting more.

But in the horror of her story, amongst the philosophical gems Sadie espouses, in the matter-of-fact analysis of all things related to life and death, in there somewhere is me. “Wear A Flower In You Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” is a story of personal calamity and twisted perversion that maybe reflects how I feel. How angry I am that I lost people, angry that my universe is not what it should be. Daring to hope that maybe there is a universe in which the feelings and dreams I have can be real.

Not that slaughtering dozens of folk is my thing. Nor even is the belief that happiness derives from pain. No, my pain – and perhaps humanity’s pain or unhappiness – is reflected in the warped excesses of Sadie’s intelligence, that her searching for happiness derived instead a negative image of what we all (or usually all of us) desire from the society in which we live.

Whilst normal people want peace, love and happiness and will do anything to make those things real, Sadie on the other hand, is so damaged by life that her core values are destroyed. Instead of peace, love and happiness she wants the opposite. To her, society is corrupt and built upon lies which destroy people. To defend her thesis as such she has built a sumptuous belief system that offers an alternative hypothesis on how to create peace, love and happiness.

I suppose that in searching for my own solutions to the problems of achieving peace, love and happiness there is a little bit of my own beliefs in what Sadie is trying to do. I feel for her. I can see why she did what she did. I can understand her frame of reference, why she feels that the universe has slipped. I know those feelings that broke her. The loss of faith in parents and the world is enough to destroy any kid’s mental health.

So with so much of me, of my experiences tied-into this book, of my pain, and my mental wanderings, Sadie reflects me to a certain extent. The only difference being, I would be mortified to kill anything knowingly.

So there-in lies my odd feelings of anxiety over Sadie’s story, an interview that overtly seeks to find out her philosophical raison d’être for mass murder. Her interview with Deborah tells her story as a horror. Yet it is the hidden evolution of her thinking, the reasons for her madness that are me. And having that made public – no matter how allegorical – is a nervous affair. Maybe people won’t realise?


Don’t forget “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” is now available for pre-order from Amazon Kindle (USD$0.81, AUD$0.99, GBP£1.02). Note that these prices can change without notice. The book is released on January 17, 2015.

Promo video for “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – a dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” (HD)

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 19, 2014 by Kaden Brown

This is so exciting!

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