Archive for ebook

“Rhesus A” Now On Kindle

Posted in Dee Dee, Fatima, Immortal Forever, Rhesus A - a Vanguard Newborn, Uncategorized, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 6, 2016 by Kaden Brown

After a very long wait, the second edition of “Rhesus A” is now available on Kindle.

VN_kadenbrown

Pre-publication poster of the book, now called “Rhesus A”.

 

To purchase visit Amazon Kindle, or simply visit https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rhesus-Kaden-Brown-ebook/dp/B01F9QGYXQ and buy the story of vampire Ashley for just £3.42 (please note, the price can change without notice) in the UK.

Hopefully, this edition has fixed the errors… please let me know if problems still persist.

Music of “Immortal Forever” Part 1

Posted in Immortal Forever with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2015 by Kaden Brown

Near the beginning of the book Svetlana is unhappy that someone is humming the tune of an officially banned piece of music. This is in early 1958. I shall not reveal exactly who is humming, suffice to say the music of concern is that of Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 7 Op. 60 “Leningrad”.

Written from (and during the siege of) Leningrad it was a massive symbol of resistance to Nazism and militarism.  It later became apparent that Shostakovich interpreted his masterpiece as both a criticism of the Nazis and Stalinism. However, the symphony had by then become an inspiration to many Soviet people.

In 1948 Shostakovich was denounced in an “anti-formalism campaign” and his works banned. Svetlana hears someone humming part of the tune (near the end of the piece) whilst visiting her father and is furious that anyone would be flouting the decrees of the Supreme Soviet. She is a good Communist and believes in the cause of the proletariat!

Tobacco - poison...

Soviet poster from 1957 “Tobacco – poison…”. Shostakovich refused to stop smoking. He died of lung cancer.

With Stalin’s death in 1953 the public could again listen to Shostakovich, but it was not until May 1958 when he was officially “rehabilitated” under the new Khrushchev regime. Later in the book, Svetlana struggles to understand the liberalisation of policy and this symbolises the struggle between socialism and liberalism, as, of course, does her struggle with – and tragic attraction to – vampirism.

The core theme of the book is this conflict, using the theme of the needs and obligations of humanity (representing the ideological discipline and determination of Stalinism and Communism) versus the apparent individual freedom and total breakdown of responsibility to society (representing western-style liberalism).

Whilst this is a classical piece of music (and the longest of Shostakovich’s work), it is probably not my own choice of vampire-related music. I prefer the heavy metal genre (obviously there is none here, given the time period of the book – 1958-1960-ish), but hey, this is my book and I’ll play what I want to.

So look forward to jazz galore as Svetlana struggles to comprehend the social changes happening around her…

“Wear A Flower In Your Hair” Is Free Aug 31

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 30, 2015 by Kaden Brown

For one day only, August 31, “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” is available on Kindle absolutely free. You can get it here.

The story of Sexy Sadie as told by herself from prison. A shocking and horrific account as to what happened and why, explaining the real philosophy behind her mass murdering – a powerful belief system that shakes one’s own sense of stability and understanding about the world and people around us. Are you ready to open your mind?

81exuOGJ9EL__SL1500_

Here is what one reviewer had to say about “Wear a Flower In Your Hair“:

“It’s a visceral. It’s gripping. It’s soul-stirring. As Sadie Mae Glutz recounted her life in her own words, I felt the full gamut of emotions. This is an American tragedy of the highest order. A mirror maze of contradictions and red herrings.
Yes, this is a bold and uncompromising vision from Kaden Brown. A master stroke of creative writing. You owe it to yourself to check it out. It’s not easy reading, but then again, it’s not meant to be. Two thumbs up from me!”

WATCH THE PROMO HERE [http://livestre.am/5br9p]

sadie_pb_coverNaturally, “Wear a Flower In Your Hair” is also available in hardback, either by ordering from your high street retailer, or by ordering online, through vendors such as Amazon , The Book Depository, and Barnes & Noble.

Product Details

ISBN-13:9781507811269

Publisher:CreateSpace Publishing

Publication date:02/01/2015

Pages:104

Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.25(d)

WP_20141231_006

Kaden Brown’s Newsletter

Posted in Newsletter, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 15, 2015 by Kaden Brown

After much delay and pondering, and much mindless head-scratching, Kaden Brown finally has a monthly newsletter that you can sign-up for!

kadenbrown_newsletter_signup

SIGN-UP FOR KADEN BROWN’S NEWSLETTER

“Happiness Is A Warm Gun”…

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , on August 9, 2015 by Kaden Brown

One of the major philosophical pillars of “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A Dialogue With Sadie Mae Glutz” revolves around the Beatles’ song from “The Beatles” (The White Album), “Happiness Is a Warm Gun“.

Interestingly, for reasons the book explains in great detail – the song is reportedly Paul McCartney’s and George Harrison’s favourite song on the White Album (see the Bruce Spizer 2003 book, “The Beatles on Apple Records.)

No wonder when one considers exactly how the meaning of the song was conceived and the massive impact the philosophy had upon late-60’s pop-culture:

The pleasure we got from life, of living by our own rules – we had none – meant we had the power, inside each one of us, to continue the cycle of pain, spread it into society and help charge-up the karma cycle. The pain we caused meant more happiness.”

“Happiness is a warm gun?”

“Ha-ha, you have it!”

“It is utterly mad.”

“You see the power of what I’m saying. It scares you.”

“Of course it does. How can you warp logic so much that innocent people die? For such a dire and terrifying possibility, that death, that pain, are good things. That they cause happiness.”

“Yet you instinctively knew that a warm gun equals happiness?”

“It’s the name of a fucking song, not some metaphysical empiricism!”

“Yet you connected the idea and the song instantly.”

“It is not that difficult. You know, to make “happiness” you cause pain.”

The interview with Susan Atkins (Sadie) explains Paul’s, George’s, and John’s conversations with her, following the band’s final concert at Candlestick Park, San Francisco on August 29, 1966. It explains how they met during a private performance at the Church of Satan where she worked. What happened next was the spark, the moment of epiphany, that set the Fab Four upon a new direction.

That night spawned an entirely new and deadly philosophy that directly led to the breakup of the band following the arrest of Manson Family members, and denials and mistruths concerning the role The Beatles played.

But then the book isn’t actually true…

This weekend only, “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A Dialogue With Sadie Mae Glutz”  is available free from Kindle.

Buy “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” paperback edition

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 6, 2015 by Kaden Brown

sadie_pb_cover

The sometimes shocking and harrowing interview with Susan Atkins (Manson Family cult member) who passed away in September 2009, is now available in paperback format for USD$7.99.

Note: this title is available to purchase for those 18 years and over.

The book can be purchased here.

Amazon comments:

“A master stroke of creative writing”

“It’s visceral. It’s gripping. It’s soul-stirring.”

I always encourage readers to visit the book review website, Goodreads. There you can find out what’s hot, gossip about your fave authors, and leave comments and reviews. “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” can be found at: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/24652445-wear-a-flower-in-your-hair—a-dialogue-with-sadie-mae-glutz

Paperback Edition of “Wear A Flower In Your Hair…”

Posted in Sadie Mae Glutz, Update with tags , , , , , , , , , , on February 1, 2015 by Kaden Brown

The paperback edition of “Wear A Flower In Your Hair – A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz” is almost ready to be published, in the next day or so. Note that the cover and book length vary from the Kindle edition, despite there being no differences in the story.

Wear A Flower In Your Hair: A dialogue with Sadie Mae Glutz

Authored by Kaden Brown
List Price: USD$7.99
6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
Black & White on Cream paper
102 pages
ISBN-13: 978-1507811269
ISBN-10: 1507811268
BISAC: Philosophy / Good & Evil
The story of Sexy Sadie as told by herself from prison. A shocking and horrific account as to what happened and why, explaining the real philosophy behind her mass murdering – a powerful belief system that shakes one’s own sense of stability and understanding about the world and people around us. Are you ready to open your mind?

This book is for adults. Contains graphic descriptions of family dysfunction, swearing, sex, drug use, murder, and justification for murder.

Screenwriting from Iowa

...and Other Unlikely Places

the Little Red Reviewer

Book Reviews: Scifi, Fantasy, and the stuff in between

Aussie Bookworm

Book reviews from Australia

BookRepublic

Books and things that matter

A.M. Harte

dark speculative fiction

booksellersnz.wordpress.com/

Booksellers New Zealand's blog

Imagine if I had a blog...

It'd look a lot like this

Jhakka's Perch

...not all those who wander are lost...